Construction contracts in Colorado put both parties in an interesting position, as they are making an agreement based on a structure that does not exist yet. This gives construction law more intricacies than typical real estate law, which is why it is so important for all sides—buyers, developers and contractors—to know where they stand.

For example, many disputes revolve around the quality of the craftsmanship. The parties who pay the contractor are expecting a certain level of quality, and they’re paying for it in the hope that they’ll get it; they can’t inspect it first and only hire the company if they like the work. Therefore, when a problem shows up and is traced to a defect, it can often lead to a lawsuit aimed at getting the contractor to pay for the mistake.

Another issue that can arise is when the company needs changes to be made to the project. If a building is not constructed in accordance with these changes, the buyer may feel wronged because he or she did not get what was requested, while the contractor may argue that the changes were never requested or that they were never granted—after all, if the contract didn’t originally lay out those specifications, both sides would need to agree on any major alterations. Miscommunication can leave both parties pointing their fingers at the other when the job is done.

Do you want to learn more about construction law, how contracts are drafted and upheld, or any other part of the process? If so, we invite you to take a look at our website as soon as you can.